Skinny Wimp Moving Co.
(855)313-5518
*Thanks to our wonderful customers, we are able to give money to The Children's Hospital and American Cancer Society
Ojai
Skinny Wimp Moving Co.

SKINNY WIMP MOVERS IN Ojai

Skinny Wimp Moving Co. is Ojai's premier movers. We know the people of Ojai take great pride in their community and we enjoy keeping up and exceeding with such great standards.

Skinny Wimp Moving Co offers full service and long distance moves, piano moves, packing and portable storage loading at low rates, with fast friendly service by our experienced professional movers. Remember, Skinny Wimp movers always hustle when not carrying your items. This saves you time and money!! Please consider us for your move in Ojai. Call today for a free 3 minute over the phone quote. I promise you won't regret it. See below for a little information on Ojai.

OJAI

Ojai is a city in Ventura County, California, USA. It is situated in the Ojai Valley, northwest of Los Angeles and southeast of Santa Barbara (10 miles long by 3 miles (4.8 km) wide, approximately, or 16 kilometers by 5 kilometers), surrounded by hills and mountains. The population was 7,461 at the 2010 census, down from 7,862 at the 2000 census.

The town is known mostly for its hotels and services catering to tourism, recreation including strong hiking, and spiritual retreats, as well as for a strong farmers' market on Sundays and an abundance of local organic agriculture. It also has an abundance of small businesses specializing in local and ecologically friendly art, design, and home improvement —such as galleries and a solar power company— as (other than a few gas stations) are forbidden by Ojai city law to encourage local small business development and keep the town unique.

The city's self-styled nickname is "The Shangri-La of Southern California", referring to the similarities between the health-and-spirituality-focused region and the mystical sanctuary of James Hilton's novel Lost Horizon.


History
The town was laid out in 1874 by real estate developer R.G. Surdam and named Nordhoff, California, in honor of the writer Charles Nordhoff. Leading up to and during World War I, American sentiment became increasingly anti-German. Across the United States, German and German-sounding place names were changed. As part of this trend, Nordhoff was renamed Ojai in 1917.

The public high school in Ojai is still named Nordhoff High School. The public junior high school, named "Matilija", formerly served as Nordhoff Union High School and still features large tiles with the initials "NUHS" on the steps of the athletic field.

The main turning point in the development of the city was the coming of Edward Libbey, early owner of the Libbey Glass Company. He saw the valley and fell in love, thinking up many plans for expansion and beautification of the existing rustic town.

A fire destroyed much of the original western-style downtown Nordhoff — Ojai in 1917. Afterwards Libbey helped design, finance, and build a new downtown more in line with the then contemporary taste for Spanish Colonial Revival style architecture. The projects included a Spanish-style arcade along the main street, a bell-tower reminiscent of the famous of the Basilica Menor de San Francisco de Asis in Havana, and a pergola opposite the arcade.

To thank Libbey for his gifts to the town, the citizens proposed a celebration to take place on March 2 of each year. Libbey declined their offer to call it "Libbey Day", and instead suggested "Ojai Day". The celebration still takes place, each year in October.

The arcade and bell tower still stand, and have come to serve as symbols of the city and the surrounding valley. Libbey's pergola was destroyed in 1971, after being damaged in an explosion. It was rebuilt in the early 2000s to complete the architectural continuity of the downtown area.

The town completed a new park, Cluff Vista Park, in 2002, which contains several small themed regions of California native plants.